SlideFab 2 Likert Chart Example Title page

Likert Charts mass creation in Powerpoint using Excel and SlideFab 2

There are plenty of ways to visualize results from surveys and benchmarks. A classical one is a line plot of the Likert scale (i.e. Likert chart / plot). While it is a great chart type, it is a pity that Excel does not offer it out of the box.

There are manuals on the internet available on how to build a Likert chart with Excel. However, this post explains how to mass create multiple slides with Likert Charts with SlideFab 2 for free. This can be useful in benchmarking surveys for example, where each participant shall receive a personalized result presentation.

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How Excel Tables exceed Named Ranges when writing legible formulas

Creating legible Excel formulas is something which is very handy, typically. No matter whether another person or oneself needs to adopt and understand an Excel file. It can be difficult to find into the logic of an old or alien Excel file: Then even plain calculations can be hard to grasp. But there are also cases where complex workbooks are easy to understand. It depends, as always:

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How to easily automate creating slides with a Powerpoint chart from Excel

UPDATE: Check out an even simpler and faster way to automate this example using linked charts based on the new SlideFab 2 v1.5. Never the less, the approach below is still valid.


 

This video is based on a scenario where lots of data in Excel is used to create numerous slides with each having a Powerpoint chart. SlideFab will create the slides and update the data ranges for the charts automatically.

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Table spreading across slides

This video is based on a scenario where a table with 1,000 rows in an Excel table shall be brought to Powerpoint. As 1,000 rows are way too much for a single slide, the table shall be spread across multiple slides. Let's call this Table Spreading. In this video the Slide Loop feature will be used to create 125 slides, where each one holds a Powerpoint table with 8 rows plus header.

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Loop Condition Example

This video is based on the "Hello World" example and and incorporates a loop condition. The loop condition can be used to not create slides, if it does not evaluate to true. In this example the loop condition is used, to leave out every second slide. So instead of all 6 slides of the "Hello World" example only slides 1,3 and 5 (candidate values "A", "C" and "E") will be created. 

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Output File Decomposition Example

This video is based on the "Hello World" example and goes one step further. This example is about output file decomposition. While the original example created 1 presentation containing 6 output slides (1 slide per loop), this video shows one output file can be created per loop (so 6 files with 1 slide each). When using output file decomposition, other features such as adding segments or sorting slides locally (per loop run) can be applied as well.

 

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Hello World Example

This brief video shows how to create a Hello World project with SlideFab 2. It will be explained how an Excel workbook can be set up and linked with Powerpoint such that multiple slides with different "Hello World" titles are created through SlideFab automatically.  

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SlideFab category tree example image for the blog post

Wolf in sheep’s clothing? How to tame the beast and create great category trees in Powerpoint automatically using SlideFab

UPDATE: SlideFab 2 is now available with groundbreaking changes. The text below is deprecated.

 

Category trees are a little bit like wolfs in sheeps' clothings: They look pretty, sometime cute. But if you try to create great category trees, they will eat up all your time. So, what is a category tree: It is visualization of numerical data which is categorized in multiple ways. The category tree gives an overview of the most important sub categories first. Then it shows how these sub categories break down. For example, it can be used to show supplier spend data on spend category and sub category level as well as the top suppliers and countries per subcategory. Gathering all these numbers and compiling these Powerpoint slides is a huge copy/paste effort. You can imagine: Chances are high that something will go wrong. And if the underlying data changes, then it basically means starting from scratch. 

Fortunately, category trees can be created with SlideFab as well. As soon as Excel model and Powerpoint presentation are set up, the slides can be created within no time. So whenever data changes it will be a piece of cake to recreate the category trees. This means faster results with less time invested and also no manual copy/paste errors made. This short video shows in less than three minutes how this looks like and how it can be done.

If you want to try it yourself, go grab the SlideFab trial version and download the category tree example from the downloads page. It is even possible to plug in your own data, just make sure to refresh the pivot tables after pasting your data.

A longer tutorial explaining this example follows soon, it will go through the model and template and explain the underlying logic. If there are questions in the meantime, feel free to reach out.